In part three of this series on immigration the subject is immigration policy for the future. Host, Dennis McCuistion, is joined by:

  • Rick Gump: Lawyer/ Owner, Richard A. Gump, Jr. PC
  • Professor Neil Foley, PhD: Southern Methodist University, Robert H. and Nancy Dedman Chair in History, Author: Mexicans and the Making of America
  • Pia Orrenius, PhD: V.P and Senior Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Adjunct Professor, Hankamer School of Business, Baylor University, Author of Beside the Golden Door: U.S. Immigration Reform in a New Era of Globalization

Left to Right: Pia Orrenius, Neil Foley and Rick Gump

Joining us via a prior taped interview to weigh in on immigration policy is Vicente Fox, former President of Mexico; who tells us, we need to pay more attention to immigration, “It is what makes a stronger more successful nation”.

This program addresses a huge question regarding immigration policy: what is the one thing we should do today to solve the immigration issue? As you might expect there is no one or simple answer and each of our panelists have diverse solutions.

Immigration in America has long been problematic. Laws and border enforcement have not resolved the challenges we face; the human, societal and economic. Our guests believe we must get beyond the ideology and the political conversation and take a look at what is in the best economic interests of the United States.

While solutions regarding immigration policy ranged from updating our visa system and having a fair and consistent enforcement program; immigration may not in fact be a huge crisis but what is actually going to “save” the U.S. It will give us the means to support an increasingly graying population and with birth rates down- this is a growing concern.

From an economic perspective our present system does not let supply meet demand. The U.S is falling behind and does not successfully attract and keep the more skilled employment based labor the U.S job market needs to move forward. Low skilled immigration has a negative economic impact. With 12 million undocumented aliens in the U.S today immigration policy reform is critical.

You may agree or not with our guests and the solutions offered but the lively discussion invites introspection. What is the solution? Join us and let us know what you think.

And as always thanks for joining us in our 25th year as we continue talking about things that matter with people who care.

Niki N. McCuistion: Trailblazer
Executive Producer/Producer
Aligning Purpose, Performance and People
Corporate Culture Change Consultant and Problem Solver
214-750-5157
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
Google+ Profile

Immigration policy is the subject of this McCuistion Program episode. Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, to continue the Immigration question on part two of our three part series are guests:

Left to Right: Rick Gump, Pia Orrenius and Hipolito Acosta

Immigration is part of the founding myth of the United States which has gone through several immigration waves in its short history. Its first; the founding colonial wave, which was largely English. Since, we’ve had the primarily German/Irish wave of 1820-1870 with German immigration the largest to date, comprising 15% of all our immigration. The third wave took place from the 19th century to World War I. Today we’re in our fourth wave.

Immigration policy has become ever more complex; as a human rights issue, jobs and economic issue, welfare issue, a cultural and a national security issue. Despite the succession of laws it still remains problematic. A 1986 law gave 3 million undocumented aliens some legalized status and had provisions to fine employers who abused the system by employing undocumented aliens.

A 1990 law expanded the number of family based visas that were being issued and resulted in the highest rate of immigrants in decades- 10-11 million people. Another law in 1996 added reinforcement provisions, more benefits were granted; even more enforcement to authorities and considerably more resources along our borders. Still illegal immigration continues; the complexity increases and our policies are still deficient.

When speaking of immigration policy, our experts challenge us to  remember why so many people immigrate to the United States, in spite of the obstacles put in their way. The answer is partly opportunity – and economic and other freedoms.  Research shows that it’s high skilled immigration which has the highest payoff for our economy. Still, as always there’s demand and supply so programs that work need to be in place to bring both the highly skilled and not so skilled into the United States, albeit  legally.

Is there one solution to our immigration policy dilemma? Secure borders, enforce the law, strong interior enforcement? The U.S. needs more comprehensive laws and  better enforcement. President Obama’s executive order helps families and offers employer reforms but is that enough to resolve the growing issue?

It’s a lively discussion on immigration policy and we go back several years with excerpts from previous programs on immigration, which include comments from: Jacob G. Hornberger, founder and president of the Future of Freedom Foundation, James F. Hollifield, PhD, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Tower Center of Political Studies at SMU and “Tom” Tancredo, former congressman, Colorado, (R).

Thanks for joining us in our 25th year of talking about things that matter with people who really care.

Niki N. McCuistion: Trailblazer
Executive Producer/Producer
Aligning Purpose, Performance and People
Corporate Culture Change Consultant and Problem Solver
214-750-5157
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
Google+ Profile

***

2211 = 02.15.15

The history of immigration in the United States is the topic of today’s discussion. Ironically even though the United States is a nation of immigrants, immigration has been a controversial issue from its very beginnings.

The immigration debate is again heating up as a result of President Obama’s executive actions as they relate to immigration. Recent news headlines report that 26 states filed a lawsuit to stop President Obama’s executive actions that would allow approximately 4.9 million eligible, undocumented immigrants to temporarily avoid deportation by applying for deferred action programs, namely the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and the Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA). The suit was initiated by then Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, who has since become the state’s governor.

On the first of our 25th anniversary programs, host, Dennis McCuistion, is joined in part one of a three part series titled A Brief History of Immigration,  by experts:

While discussing the history of immigration in the United States, our guests take us back in time to the making of our present policies and their colorful evolution. At the start of this country U.S. migration went from East to West. Westward migration expanded into Kentucky and the 1803 Louisiana Purchase pitted us directly against the Spanish Empire. There was a south to north Spanish immigration into Texas, which began  causing conflict as early as the 1820’s . The U.S. intended to own America from east coast to west coast.

We’re  reminded  of the various immigration acts,  their outcomes and challenges. At one time Mexicans were not considered immigrants, with families living on both sides of the border. The 1917 Immigration Act called for a head tax and a literacy test, partly to keep Asians, primarily Chinese from immigrating. The 1924 National Origins put quotas on SE Europeans, Irish and Italians, Poles and Slavs. Many of these acts have failed.

It’s no surprise that our guests tell us we keep repeating the same old story. We have border enforcement, which is still not secure, and the same fears of immigrants taking jobs away from citizens.

Join us this week as we talk about our country’s origins and the peoples who have made this country a great one in a Brief History of Immigration.

Thanks for joining us in our 25th year of talking about things that matter with people who really care.

Niki N. McCuistion: Trailblazer
Executive Producer/Producer
Aligning Purpose, Performance and People
Corporate Culture Change Consultant and Problem Solver
214-750-5157
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
Google+ Profile

***

2210 – 02.08.2015

 

STOP! Don’t fix your weaknesses! Focus on your strengths…

Have you ever tried to “fix” anyone? Have you focused on what doesn’t work, what you or they do wrong? Has it worked?

In 1998- Tom Rath, author of STRENGTHSFINDER 2.0, worked with a team of Gallup scientists with a goal of starting a conversation about what’s right with people. “We were tired of living in a world that revolved around fixing our weaknesses”. In their pursuit they discovered “that people have three times more potential for growth when they invest energy into developing their strengths instead of correcting their deficiencies.”

Left to Right: Gary Rifkin and Candace Fitzpatrick

The team created an assessment to help people discover their talents, based on the 34 most common talents they found. In 2001 this assessment was unveiled in the best seller; Now Discover Your Strengths. Their goal of starting a global conversation was met.

The team found that people who have the opportunity to focus on their strengths every day are six times more likely to be engaged in their jobs and three times more likely to report having an excellent quality of life in general.

Over the last 13 years I have used their work extensively- in working with my clients in corporate culture change and engaging employees for better results. It works. Now the team of Candace Fitzpatrick, Founder and CEO of CoreClarity and Gary Rifkin, CoreClarity’s Director of Strategic Communications and Training, have taken these concepts to an even more exciting and innovative level and created a series of training and discovery around them.

Joining us to talk about how to turn talents into strengths are:

Candace, not happy with the direction her then career was going, went back to school for her MBA and discovered the Gallup StrengthsFinder, which changed her life and led to the founding of CoreClarity in 2004.

She wanted to figure out the so what; “what can we do with these talents and information? How can we teach people how to use them and make them more accessible?” She adds, “This process points out the ingredients we already have in our DNA; those recurring patterns of thought, feeling or behavior that can be productively applied.” The firm “works with individuals to discover their talents so they can intentionally build on those talents to create strengths, which in turn enhances personal productivity and improves interpersonal effectiveness.

As Gary says, “I’ve taken a lot of assessments, but this one takes it deeper, to a whole new level. There are 34 different talents, and when you take this assessment you get your top 5 talents from Gallup. It’s then important to know what to do with them.” And that’s where CoreClarity comes in. CoreClarity puts the 34 STRENGTHSFINDER talents into 4 separate categories. One in 5 individuals has talents in each of the 4 categories.

The CoreClarity team says, “Contrary to old-school management philosophies, individuals, teams and organizations excel by managing their strengths, not by fixing their weaknesses. Yet society is fixated on ‘fixing’ people, trying to make them well-rounded so that they fit in anywhere.” They emphasize, “The truth is we are all gifted in different ways and trying to mold us into cookie cutter shapes is contrary to our very nature”.

If you want to learn how to revolutionize your life- join us. And as a special bonus- you’ll get to know more about Host Dennis McCuistion, and myself as CoreClarity unveils our talents.

Management guru, Peter Drucker, said, “Most Americans do not know what their strengths are. When you ask them, they look at you with a blank stare, or they respond in terms of subject knowledge, which is the wrong answer.”

PS: Host Dennis McCuistion is a Guru- one who spends a great deal of time thinking and reflecting before arriving at a conclusion or decision. A Guru’s mind does not turn off- it is always thinking. Producer, Niki McCuistion, is a Trail Blazer, one who combines the intellectual thinking talents with the drive to achieve something unique, like the McCuistion program she co-founded.

Thanks for joining us in our 25th year of talking about things that matter with people who really care.

New ways of learning are challenging the traditional higher education model!  This program explores the every changing scope of how teachers are teaching and students are learning.

Joining Dennis McCuistion are guest panelists:

 

One example of the changing model is Sal Khan‘s, Khan Academy. Austin College recently brought Sal Khan to Dallas. The Khan Academy’s mission is to get world-class education to everyone in the world for free. Using short video clips and digital content, students engage in a very different way.

To learn more from the original blog post, visit the following link: The Impact of Technology on Higher Education – Part Two.

 

Technology advances have changed many things, one of which is the way students are learning in the present day. Today’s students are prepared to live and work in a digital world and have different learning expectations as a result. In this episode we hear from expert panelists in the world of interactive teaching.

Joining Dennis McCuistion are:

  • Adam Brackin, PhD: Research Assistant Professor
    Arts and Technology, UT Dallas

    http://www.utdallas.edu/atec

To learn more about this episode, visit the original blog post: The Impact of Technology on Higher Education: A Brave New World – Part One.

Full Episode

Edward Snowden’s acts as a contractor of the National Security Administration (NSA) have caused some to call him a hero and others to call him a traitor. In this episode of the McCuistion Program Edward Snowden: Traitor or American Hero? panelists discuss the history of his acts as well as their various stances on what he did.

The debate over Edward Snowden’s decisions has galvanized and polarized many citizens.  Joining McCuistion to talk about Edward Snowden and his impact on society and government are experts:

Our experts views are provocative and very diverse on the questions of is Edward Snowden a criminal; or a whistleblower who may be eligible for protection?  To read more from the original airing follow this link: Edward Snowden: Traitor or American Hero?

 

Tune in and arrive at your own conclusions on this contentious issue.

As always we continue talking about things that  matter on issues that impacts us as citizens…

Niki N. McCuistion
Executive Producer/Producer
Aligning Purpose, Performance and People
Corporate Culture Change Consultant and Problem Solver
214-750-5157
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
Google+ Profile

***
04.06.14 – 2118

National security is the focus of this week’s episode. National security is important to all of us and the government has set agencies like NSA, CIA and FBI in place to keep the country secure.

Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, to discuss and question the issues around national security and our basic freedoms are acknowledged experts in this field:

  •  Sahar Aziz: Board Member: American Civil Liberties Union of Texas
    Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, School of Law
  • Danny O. Coulson: Former Deputy Assistant Director of the FBI
    Co-Author: No Heroes: Inside the FBI’s Counter Terror Force
  • Joshua Rovner, PhD: Director of Studies, Tower Center for Political Studies, Associate Professor of Political Science, Southern Methodist University
  • Gordon Dee Smith: CEO and Principal, Strategic Insight Group
    President of the Board, Dallas Committee on Foreign Relations

To learn more about this episode you can follow this link to the original write-up or you can watch the full length video below.

Are Government Security Agencies Essential Or a Threat to Our National Security?

 

Wall Street scandals, corporate malfeasance, the banking debacle and questionable business ethics have increasingly “forced companies and their leadership under a microscope”. Sarbanes- Oxley has brought pressure on how boards should be structured and how they operate, yet one area in corporate governance still suffers. Board diversity continues to be a challenge  in the United States, lagging behind Europe.

Left to Right: Renee Hornbaker, Niki McCuistion, Richard Leblanc, PhD, Dennis McCuistion & James Waters, JD

Left to Right: Renee Hornbaker, Niki McCuistion, Richard Leblanc, PhD, Dennis McCuistion & James Waters, JD

Many boards reflect only one segment of the overall population (primarily white males), regardless of the companies’ constituency or customer base.

Some corporate governance experts believe that what is needed is more diversity ( in gender, ethnicity, age etc) which may then provide a broader base of opinions and input.

Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, to talk about this issue and solutions are key experts in the area of corporate governance:

Our experts give various views on diversity and how the U.S.companies  measure against their  European counterparts .In  the U.S. board recruitment is often based on board members  reaching out to people they already know and are comfortable with; often individuals with views and experiences similar to their own.  Recruitment may also not take into consideration other values not reflected on the current board.

Research indicates a more diverse board, with individuals from dissimilar backgrounds, race, age and sex, as well as nationality, enriches board decisions. Studies show that a diverse board structure increases corporate performance for the better.

Focusing on just one factor of diversity, as an example, women; the percentage of S&P 500 companies with at least one female director is just over 90%, yet 10% of these companies still do not have women directors and 28% have just one.

Women hold only 14% to 16% of the seats on audit, compensation and nominating committees. Even fewer women chair the board or audit committee, serve as financial experts, and only 12% of compensation committees have a female chair.

Women add a much needed divergent value- they are not afraid to question, challenge and are the first to fire the CEO if necessary! The Credit Suisse Research Institute recently reported that net income growth over the past six years averaged 14% for companies with women directors compared to 10% for those with no female board members. In addition, a report from Catalyst, a research group focused on women’s advancement to senior leadership, found that Fortune 500 companies with more women directors, on average, outperformed those with fewer women board members on a broad range of financial indicators (Forbes, Karyn L. Twaronite, Ernst & Young).

Some European countries have mandatory quotas for female representation on boards. While not a solution on the horizon for the U.S., some institutional investors are asking for greater gender and ethnic diversity.Our experts agree, that whether it be a for-profit or nonprofit board, both require good governance, experienced board members and diverse perspectives.

Our experts agree. Whether it be a for-profit or nonprofit board, both require good governance, experienced board members and diverse perspectives. The diversity issue is one that needs to be challenged.

Talking about things that matter… with people who care.

Niki

 

Niki N. McCuistion
Executive Producer/Producer
Consultant and speaker:
On Engaging Employees, Organizational Culture, Governance and Strategic Planning
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
214-750-5157

***

2208 – 12.28.2014

Human trafficking is a form of modern slavery where people profit from the control and exploitation of others. It is forced coercion. Exploitation can include prostitution and other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs.

Left to Right: Elizabeth M. Wheaton, Niki McCuistion, Kristen Richards, Dennis McCuistion, Shawn McGraw and Rebekah

While accurate figures are difficult to access, the International Labor Organization estimates that there are 20.9 million victims of human trafficking globally, including 5.5 million children. Fifty-five percent are women and girls.

There are two primary factors driving the spread of human trafficking: high profits and low risk. This well-hidden, American epidemic involves, from a sex trafficking perspective, at least 100,000 children in the U.S., a $9.8 billion industry. The average age of entry into sex trafficking is 13 years old.

While human trafficking spans all demographics, certain circumstances or vulnerabilities may lead to a higher susceptibility to victimization and human trafficking:

  • Runaways and homeless youth
  • Victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, war or conflict, or social discrimination
  • Foreign nationals who have paid large recruitment and travel fees to labor recruiters

Texas is a hub, #2 in incidences of human trafficking with California being the highest in incidences (Dept. of Homeland Security). The Department of Justice designated the I-10 corridor, which runs from California to Florida, as the #1 route for human trafficking in the US. One-third of this traffic goes through Texas, 1 in 4 victims are transported along I-10, and Dallas/ Ft. Worth, Houston and San Antonio, which has been designated as the Texas triangle, is one of the most prevalent places for trafficking in the country.

Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, are professionals in the awareness and prevention field, including:

  • Elizabeth M. Wheaton, PhD – Economist, Senior Lecturer, Cockrell-McKintosh Faculty -in-residence, Southern Methodist University, who talks about the economics of human trafficking. She asks, “if there is no money to be made from human trafficking, would it exist”? Unfortunately there is not good data.
  • Kristen Richards – The Director of Volunteers for Traffick911, a nonprofit organization committed to a world without slavery. The organization has been recognized by Homeland Security Investigations as a most-valued partner in the battle to save American children from sexual slavery. Traffick911 has trained thousands of first responders across the country, has safe homes and works in both intervention and prevention.
  • Rebekah – A survivor, trafficked for 10 years, who talks about her personal situation and is now an advocate who has dedicated her life to building awareness and prevention of this issue.
  • Shawn McGraw – Supervisory Special agent, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security who conducts investigations regarding this crime. He concentrates on North Texas, receiving leads from various sources. He says it is one of the most unrecorded crimes, with victims seeing themselves part of the crime.

Human trafficking happens in our own country, our own backyards. It is imperative we know more about this growing epidemic. Awareness and involvement on everyone’s part is critical. This is not just a law enforcement problem – it is a people problem.

Join us to see how you personally can help.

Talking about things that matter… with people who care.

Niki

 

Niki N. McCuistion
Executive Producer/Producer
Consultant and speaker:
On Engaging Employees, Organizational Culture, Governance and Strategic Planning
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
214-750-5157

***

2205 – 11.23.14