What is the role of journalism? Is there a significant failure on the part of journalism which instead of pursuing critical investigation and scrutiny is too often working in tandem with government? Does a relationship between journalists and government officials prevent the American media from being watchdogs over government? Are journalists now a division of corporate America- the media division? And have journalists and citizen journalists gone too far and endangered national security?

Panelists from Part 1 & 2 – Left to Right: Daxton “Chip” Stewart, PhD, Dee Smith, Tod Robberson, Niki McCuistion, Dennis McCuistion and Charles “Chip” Babcock

Joining us is Glenn Greenwald, cited as one of today’s most controversial journalists. He is co-founder of the Intercept Papers and author of No Place to Hide. Greenwald believes that media has in fact deviated from its role of watchdog to become servants and spokespeople for the government. He cites the breakdown in the coverage of the Iraq war, when supposedly respected journalists repetitively quoted anonymous sources and used little to no investigative scrutiny on stories which made the front page of the New York Times.

Our other guests include:

  • Tod Robberson – Former Editorial Writer with the Dallas Morning News, now with the St. Louis Times Dispatch,
  • Daxton “Chip” Stewart, PhD – Associate Dean, Associate Professor, Bob Schieffer College of Communication, and
  • Charles, “Chip” Babcock, Partner, Jackson Walker, L.L.P.

Our guests agree, government needs checks and balances, adversaries who monitor what they say. In order to sustain democracy a critical check for those in power at any level, government, corporations etc. is needed. Yet too often media has become integrated into the halls of power, rather than remain outside of it.

Many media outlets are now owned by corporate America. So rather than be controversial, media is playing safe. Yet independence is critical to reporting. There is a concern that individual freedom and liberty is now exchanged for security. At what price? Is security the all-important paramount value? If individual liberty and independence are equally important then we will continue to incur greater risks.

Left to Right: Niki McCuistion, Glenn Greenwald and Dennis McCuistion

There is a price to a free democratic press and society. Our experts pose questions and provide answers in this provocative and lively discussion. The panelists agree, there is still terrific journalism being done. And it is far from just being print. Bloggers and the Internet open new doors and bring more scrutiny…

The bottom line, a free press is the cornerstone of democracy. Join us as this is truly a conversation of things that matter with people who care.

And please don’t forget that for the last 25 years it is you, our viewer who keeps us on the air.

The McCuistion Program, a 501 ( C ) ( 3 ) tax exempt organization does not receive any KERA pledge dollars, PBS funds or government grants, so thank you for your continued support.

Warm regards,

Niki McCuistion
Co-Founder, Executive Producer, Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

Be sure to watch more McCuistion TV programs on our website www.McCuistionTV.com.

***

2302 – 02.07.16

Join us for a lively discussion on the role of journalism and the potential impact on national security if too much information is given to the public. So where’s the fine line?

Guests:

  • Tod Robberson: Former Editorial Writer, Dallas Morning News
  • Gordon Dee Smith: CEO, Strategic Insight Group, CEO, Dallas Committee on Foreign Affairs
  • Charles “Chip” Babcock: Partner, Jackson Walker, L.L.P
  • Glenn Greenwald: Author of No Place to Hide and the Intercept Papers

Left to Right: Niki McCuistion, Glenn Greenwald and Dennis McCuistion

Greenwald, who has been labeled as one of the single most polarizing figures in American journalism today and Laura Poitras, a documentarian, met with Edward Snowden in Hong Kong a few years ago and interviewed him for what became the basis of the documentary Citizen Four as well as Greenwald’s book, No Place to Hide. The duo- Greenwald and Poitras taped the interviews with much concern, not knowing if at any moment there would be a knock on the door, Snowden arrested and their material confiscated.

The ethics of journalism and whether the public has the “right to know”, even if at the expense of national security sparks some interesting insight from our experts. Our guests have strong opinions on the role of journalism and how it should be practiced.

Panelists from Part 1 & 2 – Left to Right: Daxton “Chip” Stewart, PhD, Dee Smith, Tod Robberson, Niki McCuistion, Dennis McCuistion and Charles “Chip” Babcock

From Greenwald’s perspective, labeling Snowden as a traitor is irrational. He says, “Snowden did not act as a traitor would, but instead acted as a whistleblower. He did not sell the material he had for a profit, nor pass it on to enemies of the U.S. or publish it on the Internet. In fact he says, he did the exact opposite. Snowden met with journalists, offered the material and asked that they get input from our government on it.” Greenwald states more whistleblowers have been jailed and tried under this present administration than any other.

Our guests viewpoints differ somewhat. We talk about what journalism is and is not, its vital role in democracy, as watchdog, and the increasing need to shine a light on what our leaders do and say.

The issues are complex. As Americans we reject the idea of our own government spying on us and hope they do the right thing. Yet what is the right thing in a world of more connectivity and more margin for leaks and errors that could endanger our democracy?

And please don’t forget that for the last 25 years it is you, our viewer who keeps us on the air.

The McCuistion Program, a 501 ( C ) ( 3 ) tax exempt organization does not receive any KERA pledge dollars, PBS funds or government grants, so thank you for your continued support.

Warm regards,

Niki McCuistion
Co-Founder, Executive Producer, Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

The third in a three parts series on the past, present and future of health care, this episode focuses on the latter. Our experts agree that health care in the future will look very different. Technology has made a huge impact and will continue doing so, taking us out of the industrial age and into the knowledge age. Knowledge and ideas are now the main source of growth in many areas, most certainly health care.

Joining us are panelists:

Left to Right: Michael F. Weisberg, MD, Marianne Fazen, PhD, Dennis McCuistion & Charlie Feld

Technology, and its new tools from the smart phone and other, impacts how we buy and make decisions. Customers now have access to prime resources and can bypass the middle man. This will impact value and costs. We need to rethink the future as the old rules will not work any longer.

While the future is exciting, costs are rising and more of that cost is shifting to the patient. The good news is we’re living longer, healthier lives because of better health care availability and many more individuals taking more responsibility for their health. T. Colin Campbell, PhD, co- author of The China Study, chimes in via a previously taped program on how diet affects our health and other steps the Cleveland Clinic recommends to keep healthy longer.

High tech medicine such as robotic surgery reduces errors and the rise of consumerism means more consumer directed health care and on demand care – when and where individuals need it.

Innovation is changing future therapies. Therapies will be genetically directed so health care professionals will be able to tell the pathway that led to a disease and diagnose and cure uniquely to an individual’s needs. The future brings a better understanding of human micro biotics and the bacteria that causes illnesses.

Bureaucracy in health care is still overwhelming, but changes are disrupting our old systems- hopefully for the better.

Tune in to learn more about how the future and disruptive innovation will change your life and your health.

And please don’t forget that for the last 25 years it is you, our viewer who keeps us on the air.

The McCuistion Program, a 501 ( C ) ( 3 ) tax exempt organization does not receive any KERA pledge dollars, PBS funds or government grants, so thank you for your continued support.

Warm regards,

Niki McCuistion
Co-Founder, Executive Producer, Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

***

2226 – 01.24.16

The second in a three parts series on the past, present and future of healthcare.

Changes in healthcare? One constant in healthcare is change. There are significant advancements in healthcare technology and the treatments available to us. Today more people are accessing healthcare than ever before and there is more expensive care to be accessed.

The HMO’s and other types of payment organizations of the past restricted access to care because of costs and availability. To some degree physicians were paid by denying access to care, functioning as gatekeepers with a member per month allowance. Today, some of these issues are being revisited by ACO’s (accountable care organizations).

Left to Right: Don R. Read, Dennis McCuistion, M.D., Britt R. Berrett, Ph.D.  & Adam Myers, M.D.

Our studio guests discussing changes in healthcare include:

Joining us through prior taped segments to talk about changes in healthcare are past panelists: Scott Flannery, United Health Care, Steve Love, Dallas-Fort Worth Hospital Council and Stanley F. Hupfeld, Chairman, Integris Health Systems and author of Political Malpractice. Our experts agree we have to increase access and enhance quality so care is optimized. One of the changes in healthcare for the better is the use of integrated teams. Healthcare technology today is so sophisticated and dynamic that a multidisciplinary effort is now needed. Healthcare is a team sport.

We’re also seeing other healthcare professionals getting involved in treating what doctors traditionally have. Healthcare professionals are being asked to operate at the top of their license. And we learn, maybe tongue in cheek, that Dr. Google is not always right.

10,000 people are coming on Medicare/Medicaid rolls daily; so the government is in the business of healthcare. Revenue streams that match delivery systems are critical. How do we deliver the best levels of care at a reasonable price? Today we are curing illnesses and diseases that have never been cured before. We have infinite perceived needs but finite resources. Individuals also need to be aware of how their own personal behaviors impact their health and take individual responsibility.

No doubt we are presently in the Golden Age of healthcare. Join us for an interesting and educational discussion on whether healthcare is a right, the technological explosion and how costs will personally impact your access to the best healthcare.

Thank you for joining us as we continue talking about things that matter with people who care.

And please don’t forget that for the last 25 years it is you, our viewer who keeps us on the air.

The McCuistion Program, a 501 ( C ) ( 3 ) tax exempt organization does not receive any KERA pledge dollars, PBS funds or government grants, so thank you for your continued support.

Warm regards,

Niki McCuistion
Co-Founder, Executive Producer, Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

***
2225 – 01.17.2016

Healthcare has become ever more complex and expensive with too many citizens not always getting the full healthcare they may need. Still we’ve come a long way in the treatment of diseases that once meant certain death and in how we treat disease and illnesses.

Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, to talk about the history of healthcare and the progress we’ve made are medical experts:

  • Michael Weisberg, MD: Gastroenterologist, Author: The Hospitalist
  • Adam Myers, MD: Chief Medical officer, Texas Health Physicians Group
  • Don R. Read, MD: President-Elect, Texas Medical Association
Left to Right: Michael Weisberg, MD, Adam Myers, MD, & Don R. Read, MD

Left to Right: Michael Weisberg, MD, Adam Myers, MD, & Don R. Read, MD

 

Guests talk about the many healthcare advances we’ve made, of which one of the most important in this century is the treatment of infectious diseases. In the 1900s most deaths were of children under 5 from infectious diseases. Today the antibiotics and vaccines, penicillin and insulin developed in this and last century are hugely influential in eradicating deaths due to infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, small pox, aids and diabetes.

Research and science have paved the way to new thoughts and treatments. Open windows for patients with pneumonia are history. Interestingly some of the same folk remedies are in still in use, except that leeches are now medical grade and nature is where many antibiotics derive from.

If video doesn’t play correctly, open it here.

One of the biggest changes to healthcare is the loss of the primary care doctor and the old fashioned doctor-patient relationship. At one time there was no emergency room physician and so your own doctor followed you to the operating room. Doctors made house calls, virtually a thing of the past.
Medicines and healthcare have become so complex; with the wealth of knowledge doubling every four years that one person cannot be all things to each patient. We learn that 90% of healthcare costs, which continue to spiral upwards and out of control, are incurred in the last six months of our life. And we learn more about Medicare, from Dr. Ed Annis, author of Code Blue, who joins in via a previously televised McCuistion program. Dr. Annis, a former president of the American Medical Association and the World Medical Association, was one of the most foremost critics of the United States Medicare program.
This segment on the history of healthcare is the first in a three part series on healthcare, sets the stage for one of our most important social and economic issues today; healthcare and its economic, political challenge.
As always thanks for joining us as we continue talking about things that matter with people who care.
We wish you a happy, healthy new year.

Warm regards,

Niki N. McCuistion
Executive Producer/Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

Be sure to watch more McCuistion TV programs on our website www.McCuistionTV.com.

Is voter ID a good idea? Voting is one of our most fundamental responsibilities and civic duties. American democracy would not exist without free and open elections. Yet the issue of voting and voter rights (such as voter ID laws) has been a point of contention throughout our history.

Eligibility to vote by citizens of the U.S. is established in the U.S. Constitution and several amendments have broadened prior eligibility requirements “the right to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any other state on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude”, to include the right of women to vote and anyone age 18 and over.

Left to Right: Elizabeth Alvarez-Bingham, Linda Wassenich, Matt Angle & Tom Pauken standing

In 1965, the Voting Rights Act granted the Federal government exceptional power over states to stop “systematic and ingenious discrimination”, which was subsequently amended by the Supreme Court just 2 plus years ago. This has triggered heated debates with, among other issues, voter ID laws and requirements. Supporters of
voter ID laws say they help prevent voter fraud – attempts by ineligible voters to vote. Opponents argue that voter ID laws violate voting rights laws and are actually intended to reduce voting among minorities.

Joining Host, Dennis McCuistion, are participants on both sides of the voter ID debate and what is becoming an increasingly divisive issue:

  • Matt Angle: Founder and Director of the Lone Star Project; Former Executive Director of the House Democratic Caucus,
  • Elizabeth Alvarez-Bingham: Attorney, Vice Chairman, Dallas County Republican Party
  • Tom Pauken: Former Chairman, Texas Workforce Commission
  • Linda Wassenich: National League of Women Voters Board Member and Development Chair.

From 84 to 95 percent of all registered U.S. voters already have a state-issued form of voter ID, according to a 206-page analysis of 10 independent studies reviewed by the Government Accountability Office (GAO). According to the GAO, a total of 33 states had enacted requirements for voters to show some form of ID at the polls on Election Day as of June 2014. In Texas, approximately 600,000 Texas residents do not have a government issued photo ID. Texas requirements for voter IDs include any of the following: Driver’s license, concealed handgun license, passport, election certification certificate, a personal or military identification card, citizen’s certificate or naturalization certificate with photo.

The arguments ask Do Voter ID Laws Reduce Voter Turnout?

Ten separate studies reviewed by the GAO showed that the various forms of state voter ID laws had resulted in mixed effects on turnout. All 10 studies examined general elections before 2008, and 1 of the 10 studies also included the 2004 through 2012 general elections. Five of the 10 studies found that voter ID laws “had no statistically significant effect” on voter turnout. Four studies found that ID laws had reduced turnout, and one found turnout had increased after enactment of a voter ID law.

Ownership of valid state ID varied by racial and ethnic groups. For example, noted the GAO, one study estimated that 85% of White registered voters and 81% of African-American registered voters in one state had a valid ID for voting purposes in that state.

However, a nationwide study performed in the fall of 2013 found a much wider range, with 93% of White and 90% of Hispanic registered voters having a valid photo-ID driver’s license, compared to only 79% of registered African-American voters.

If video doesn’t play correctly, open it here.

A separate report issued in 2011 by the Brennan Center for Justice suggested that combined voting laws – including voter ID laws – could cause more than 5 million eligible voters to find it significantly harder or even impossible to cast ballots in future elections.

Census Bureau research has documented how the voting population has grown more diverse in recent presidential elections. Voting rates for presidential elections have shifted from year to year, and have actually decreased across the duration of the time series (64.0 percent in 1980 and 61.8 percent in 2012), while voting rates for congressional elections have decreased as well (48.9 percent in 1978, 41.9 percent in 2014).

In 2014, 43.0 percent of women reported voting, compared with 40.8 percent of men. Reported voting rates were also higher for Whites (45.8 percent) than for Blacks (40.6 percent), Asians (26.9 percent), and Hispanics (27.0 percent). Voters between the ages of 45 and 64 years, with incomes over $100,000 and with advanced degrees, consistently made up a higher percentage of voters than other age groups (Source: United States Census Bureau).

Join us to watch this spirited discussion and chime in with “your vote”.

And have a wonderful holiday season.

Niki N. McCuistion
Executive Producer/Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

Voter fraud has become a topic of consideration as the 2016 elections approach.

Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, are guests:

  • Rene Martinez: Regional Director, LULAC
  • Tom Pauken: Former Chairman, Texas Workforce Commission, former member of President Reagan’s White House staff, and
  • Dan Wallach, PhD (via Skype): Professor, Department of Computer Science, Rice University, Houston, Texas
2222

Left to Right: Rene Martinez, Dennis McCuistion and Tom Pauken

Texas has a colorful and questionable history regarding voter fraud, from Lyndon Johnson’s 1948 contested runoff between Coke Stevenson and Johnson (Johnson won by only 87 votes out of 988,295 cast – one of the closest results in a senatorial election in U.S. history. Stevenson challenged the result on grounds of ballot stuffing. However, the Democratic State Central Committee sustained Johnson’s victory by a 29-28 vote); to other much less known elected officials.

There are many ways a signature on a ballot can be forged. Absentee ballots or the ballots of the elderly who may have someone else make out their ballots for them, can be problematic.

There is no question that the honesty and integrity of our elections is critical. Yet do we really have a large scale voter fraud issue? Or are we talking about isolated and not systemic voter fraud?

If video doesn’t play correctly, open it here.

While some say voter fraud is a widespread issue, they are challenged by those who state that the issue is that of vast demographic changes which have created a sense of voter fraud as so many more minorities, principally Hispanics are now voting.

And then there’s technology. Election voting machines can enable voter fraud. They were not designed with any potential voter fraud possibility. There is no way of doing recounts, and there are security issues and potential security liabilities.

Are there discrepancies? Or is the issue vastly overrated? Regardless, there are people who are ready to defraud the system and we have a system which is vulnerable.

Join the discussion and let us know what you think.

Thank you for tuning in as we continue talking about the issues that impact our daily lives.

Niki N. McCuistion
Executive Producer/Producer
Business Consultant / Executive Coach, specializing in Organizational Culture Change, Governance and Strategic Planning
214-750-5157
www.nikimccuistion.com
nikin@nikimccuistion.com

We’ve arrived!

NFL Films is using a clip from the McCuistion Program, Techno Trends Part 1, on part of their documentary series program entitled, “A Tale of Two Cities”, that will air on the NFL Network on Saturday, December 19th 2015.

Dennis asks a guest in the audience, “What is an internet”?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIc7mJ8Tjxw.

We’re excited they sought us out. So if you watch the NFL Network, please comment, tweet, Facebook and all manner of communication.

As always thanks for your support and friendship.
Niki
Niki N. McCuistion:
Executive Producer/Producer
Executive coach, culture change strategist and speaker
Aligning Purpose, Performance and People
214-750-5157
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
Google+ ProfileBe sure to watch more McCuistion TV programs on our website www.McCuistionTV.com.
 

We welcome your donations. Now you may give via your mobile by scanning the QR code or via give.mobi/frtv.

The McCuistion Program is funded solely through your generosity and donor request and grants.

We do not receive any PBS, Pledge or government funding.
Thank you for your generosity.

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy was a tragedy that had repercussions worldwide, forever changing the way news is reported. The President’s day started in Fort Worth with crowds exuberantly greeting the President and Mrs. Kennedy. In Dallas as crowds lined the motorcade path, the mood was cheerful, excited and welcoming. All the while, the city officials were relieved, as the anticipated backlash of the events did not occur.

Joining host, Dennis McCuistion, are guests who were at the scene of the JFK assassination on the day of the tragedy.

  • Hugh Aynesworth: Former reporter at the Dallas Morning News
  • Bob Huffaker: Former reporter with CBS and KRLD, Co-Author: When the News Went Live: Dallas 1963
  • Darwin Payne PhD: Historian, Professor Emeritus, Southern Methodist University
  • Bert Shipp: Former reporter, WFAA- Dallas
  • Buell Wesley Frazier: Co-worker, Lee Harvey Oswald
  • Eugene Boone: Former Deputy Sherriff, Dallas County- 1962-1972
Left to Right: Darwin Payne, Niki McCuistion, Hugh Aynesworth, Dennis McCuistion, Bob Huffaker

Left to Right: Darwin Payne, Niki McCuistion, Hugh Aynesworth, Dennis McCuistion, Bob Huffaker

Join reporters and law enforcement officials who were at the scene of the assassination, for a firsthand account of the tragedy and the day “the news went live”.

This episode is the second in our JFK Perspective series.

This program addresses a huge question regarding immigration policy: what is the one thing we should do today to solve the immigration issue? As you might expect there is no one or simple answer and each of our panelists have diverse solutions.

Host, Dennis McCuistion, is joined by:

  • Rick Gump: Lawyer/ Owner, Richard A. Gump, Jr. PC
  • Professor Neil Foley, PhD: Southern Methodist University, Robert H. and Nancy Dedman Chair in History, Author: Mexicans and the Making of America
  • Pia Orrenius, PhD: V.P and Senior Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Adjunct Professor, Hankamer School of Business, Baylor University, Author of Beside the Golden Door: U.S. Immigration Reform in a New Era of Globalization

If video doesn’t play correctly, open it here.

You may agree or not with our guests and the solutions offered but the lively discussion invites introspection. What is the solution? Join us and let us know what you think.

And as always thanks for joining us in our 25th year as we continue talking about things that matter with people who care.

Niki N. McCuistion: Trailblazer
Executive Producer/Producer
Aligning Purpose, Performance and People
Corporate Culture Change Consultant and Problem Solver
214-750-5157
nikin@nikimccuistion.com
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